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Sex, Adiposity, and Hypertension Status Modify the Inverse Effect of Marine Food Intake on Blood Pressure in Alaska Native (Yup'ik) People.

TitleSex, Adiposity, and Hypertension Status Modify the Inverse Effect of Marine Food Intake on Blood Pressure in Alaska Native (Yup'ik) People.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBeaulieu-Jones, BR, O'Brien, DM, Hopkins, SE, Moore, JH, Boyer, BB, Gilbert-Diamond, D
JournalJ Nutr
Volume145
Issue5
Pagination931-8
Date Published2015 May
ISSN1541-6100
KeywordsAdiposity, Adult, alaska, Animals, Aquatic Organisms, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Community-Based Participatory Research, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Erythrocytes, Fatty Acids, Omega-3, Female, Fishes, Humans, Hypertension, Inuits, Male, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Factors, Rural Health, Seafood, Sex Factors, Shellfish
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alaska Native people currently have a higher prevalence of hypertension than do nonnative Alaskans, although in the 1950s hypertension was rare among Alaska Native people. A novel biomarker of marine foods, the nitrogen isotope ratio (δ¹⁵N) in RBCs was shown to be negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Few studies have examined how individual characteristics modify the association of marine food intake with blood pressure.

OBJECTIVE: This exploratory analysis examined whether sex, adiposity, and hypertension modify the inverse association between marine food intake and blood pressure.

METHODS: We used covariate-adjusted linear models to describe the association between δ¹⁵N and blood pressure in 873 adult Alaska Native (Yup'ik) people who resided in 8 communities in southwest Alaska. We separately stratified by sex, body mass index (BMI) group, abdominal obesity, and hypertension status and assessed the interaction between δ¹⁵N and participant characteristics on blood pressure via likelihood ratio tests.

RESULTS: The association between δ¹⁵N and systolic blood pressure was modified by sex, BMI status, and abdominal obesity, with the inverse association observed only in the male (β = -1.5; 95% CI: -2.4, -0.6 : , nonobese BMI (β = -1.7; 95% CI: -2.5, -1.0), and non-abdominally obese (β = -1.6; 95% CI: -2.4, -0.9) strata (all P-interaction < 0.0001). A reduction in diastolic blood pressure associated with δ¹⁵N was observed in the nonobese BMI (β = -1.1; 95% CI: -1.7, -0.5) and non-abdominally obese (β = -1.1; 95% CI: -1.7, -0.5) strata, although only the interaction between BMI group and δ¹⁵N with diastolic blood pressure was significant. The inverse association between δ¹⁵N and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in nonhypertensive individuals, although the comparison had limited power. The results were consistent with those identified by using combined RBC concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid as the biomarker of marine food intake, although the associations identified by using δ¹⁵N were larger.

CONCLUSIONS: Obesity status modified the inverse association between marine food intake and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adult Alaska Native (Yup'ik) people. The inverse association between δ¹⁵N and systolic blood pressure was also modified by sex.

DOI10.3945/jn.114.209619
Alternate JournalJ. Nutr.
PubMed ID25788581
PubMed Central IDPMC4408740
Grant ListL60 MD006380 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
P20 GM103534 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P20 GM104416 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P20 RR016430 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P20GM103534 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P20GM104416 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P20RR016430 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA023108 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 GM103325 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P30GM103325 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK074842 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 LM009012 / LM / NLM NIH HHS / United States
R01 LM010098 / LM / NLM NIH HHS / United States
R01DK074842 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01LM009012 / LM / NLM NIH HHS / United States
R01LM010098 / LM / NLM NIH HHS / United States