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Acute lysine supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity in older, overweight individuals.

TitleAcute lysine supplementation does not improve hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity in older, overweight individuals.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsKim, I-Y, Williams, RH, Schutzler, SE, Lasley, CJ, Bodenner, DL, Wolfe, RR, Coker, RH
JournalNutr Metab (Lond)
Volume11
Issue1
Pagination49
Date Published2014
ISSN1743-7075
Abstract

CONTEXT: Lysine supplementation may have a positive influence on the regulation of glucose metabolism but it has not been tested in the geriatric population.

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the impact of acute lysine supplementation using three randomized experimental scenarios: 1) oral glucose alone (control), 2) oral glucose and low-dose lysine (2 grams), and oral glucose and high dose lysine (5 grams) lysine in 7 older (66 ± 1 years/age), overweight/obese (BMI = 28 ± 2 kg/m(2)) individuals.

METHODS: We utilized a dual tracer technique (i.e., [6,6-(2)H2] glucose primed constant infusion and 1-[(13)C] glucose oral ingestion) during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to examine differences in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity under all three scenarios.

RESULTS: Post-absorptive plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were not different between the three trials. Similarly, the response of glucose and insulin concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) was similar in the three trials. The results of the Matsuda index (ISI/M) were also not different between the three trials. As an index of hepatic insulin sensitivity, there were no significant differences in the endogenous glucose rate of appearance (glucose Ra) for control, 2 g lysine and 5 g lysine (1.2 ± 0.1, 1.1 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1 mg•kg(-1)•min(-1)), respectively. With respect to peripheral insulin sensitivity, there were no significant differences in the glucose rate of disappearance (glucose Rd) for control, 2 g lysine and 5 g lysine (4.2 ± 0.1, 4.3 ± 0.2, and 4.5 ± 0.4 mg•kg(-1)•min(-1)), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Previous studies in younger participants have suggested that lysine may have a beneficial effect on glucose metabolism. However, acute lysine supplementation in the older population does not facilitate beneficial changes in glucose Ra or glucose Rd.

DOI10.1186/1743-7075-11-49
Alternate JournalNutr Metab (Lond)
PubMed ID25324894
PubMed Central IDPMC4198625
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